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20121202
20121210
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)
can get this sorted out, you can really move forward, and therefore, i think now that your elections are out of the way, i'm just speaking as an outsider, now your election is out of the way, there's going to be all this bargaining and positions, but my expectations, i hope, and the desire of the world, is sorted out, and we can move on, and then sort our own problems out. >> for those of us in the united states, we see sort of what seems to be two intractable issues. republicans saying we will not raise taxes on the top 2% of earners. the democrats say we're certainly not going to have cuts that hurt spending cuts that hurt the middle class. and as the proposals go on the table they seem intractable on it. >> they do. but you would expect them, the republicans to be more on the tax side and democrats to be more on the we're not cutting spending side. this is pretty routine type of argument. the question is, you know, are they so far apart they can't bridge the gap? i think they could bridge the gap. you know, there have been proposals put forward on a cross-party basis before that v
all know that was a kingmaker over the last two election cycles, a kingmaker on the tea party side. he is probably the person responsible for getting five tea party-backed members into the senate, including the most famous, marco rubio. he was backing marco rubio when established republicans were backing charlie crist. he says he can do more as an ideas now over at heritage, the oldest think tank on the conservative side. keep your eye on the governor of south carolina, she's a republican, it's up to her to pick a replacement to serve for two years who will she pick? that's what everybody wants to know. >> all right. thanks. >>> in egypt, opponents of president mohammed morsi are expected to take to the streets again. they were out in force last night in cairo chanting it was time for their president to resign. their anger was sparked two weeks ago when morsi granted himself sweeping powers. last night, morsi refused to rescind that decree, despite calls from proponents calling for him to do so. >>> the photographer who took a picture of a man standing on the subway tracks as a train a
was elected to serve. his job, those are his constituents. that's his job. >> well, look. i see where you're coming from but we have to think about this in a broader sense. okay? if every state is looking out only for itself, what they're going to do is free ride. they're going to engage in policies that damage everyone's wellbeing over the long term looking out for their own re-election prospects. >> wait, wait. >> they're really political rather than looking out for the long-term interests of the citizens, their states and also the country as a whole. >> last i checked -- >> beforehand rather than subsidize development and dangerous areas and that's moral hazard and that's something that's bringing the country to the knees economically. >> last i checked you look out for yourself. >> that's public servants are supposed to do, roland. >> no. in new york, you are concerned about new york and not california. you focus on where you are. that's the reality. >> all right. we are going to hit pause there. please let us know what you think about that conversation on twitter and facebook page. >
be concerned about every citizen in the state that he was elected to serve. his job -- those are his constituents and that's his job. >> look, i see where you come from. we have to think about this in a broader sense. if every state is looking out for itself, there's going to free ride. they're going to engage in policies that damage everyone's well-being over the long term by looking out for their own re-election prospects. these guys are being political rather than looking out for the long-term interests of their citizens, their states and also the country as a whole. rather than sub sid dies development in really dangerous areas. that's called moral hazard, and that's something that's really bringing the country to its knees economically. >> last i checked, you look out for yourself. you might say that's not a great idea, if you're in new york -- actually, no, if you're in new york you're concerned about new york and not about california. you focus on where you are. that's a reality. >> all right. thanks very much to both of us. please let us know what you think about that on twit
-sex marriage should be legal. 46% say illegal. and on election day, voters in three states approved same-sex marriage. "outfront," mckay coppins, tim carney and maria cardona, cnn contributor and democratic strategist. this is kind of big news in all of this. tim, you saw the polls. now the supreme court will get involved in this. should this signal something to the republican party? should they say it's reached this level, we need to rethink our position on this? >> polls are one thing. there's also the fact most states don't have gay marriage yet and most of those that do, it was not put in by the will of the people. i'm a marylander. we did -- our state did vote for gay marriage. most of them had to do with judges ruling. if the supreme court does for gay marriage what it did for abortion and roe v. wade and said, no, this is not in the hands of the people. we're going to say there's gay marriage, that would do a lot to fire up the republican base and could turn this issue on its head and it could become a big winner for republicans because they'd feel disenfranchised. >> what about t
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)